Health

7 Early Signs You’ve Caught Coronavirus

You’re hot, your throat tickles, your eye feels wonky—and, oh no, is this it? Is this the coronavirus? Do you have it??? Here are seven early signs that you might.

Sick woman sneezing and blowing nose
Shutterstock

“For most people, the coronavirus will be like any other flu or cold. Many people catch these illnesses during their lives and experience only mild symptoms,” says Dr. Carrie Lam

“There are no special signs or symptoms of coronavirus. In fact, that is one of the reasons why it spread so quickly,” says Dr. Kaushal M. Kulkarni, a board-certified ophthalmologist.

woman, annoyed, frustrated fed up sticking her finger in her throat
Shutterstock

“Thirty percent of patients have loss of smell (anosmia) and loss of taste (ageusia) as their first signs of a COVID-19 infection,” says Dr. Jonathan Kaplan. “Because of the relationship between smell and taste, taste can also be significantly affected. It can take weeks to recover,” says Dr. Inna Husain.

Sick man lying on sofa checking his temperature at home in the living room
Shutterstock

“Coronavirus often begins with a fever of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit within 2-14 days of exposure to an infected person,” says Dr. LaFarra Young, a pediatric pathologist and health coach.

Young ill woman in bed at home
Shutterstock

“If you notice a slight cough or fever this would be reason enough to begin self-isolation allowing a couple of days to see if symptoms manifest,” says Dr. Giuseppe Aragona, a family medicine doctor. “It has been reported that the respiratory symptoms will worsen after a week, though in some cases the incubation period can be as little as two days.”

Tired woman with closed eyes leaning over coach at home
Shutterstock

“Some older or immunosuppressed individuals may not present with a fever, instead presenting with other common symptoms such as sore throat, dry cough, or fatigue,” says Dr. LaFarra Young, a pathologist at King’s Daughters Medical Center. “Fatigue is a daily lack of energy; unusual or excessive whole-body tiredness not relieved by sleep,” reports WebMD. “Fatigue can prevent a person from functioning normally and affects a person’s quality of life.”

Portrait of casual 50s mature Asian man heartburn, pressing on chest with painful expression, sitting on sofa at home, medicines and water on table.
Shutterstock

Can’t get enough air in your lungs? “Extreme shortness of breath and respiratory issues are what is causing the increase in patients in the ICU. Increasing your immune system using Vitamin D can help decrease the likeliness of the spread of bacterial and viral infections,” says Dr. Geoffrey Mount Varner.

Closeup of irritated red bloodshot eye
Shutterstock

Here’s one we haven’t seen widely reported. “Conjunctivitis, or more commonly known as pink eye, can present as a symptom of coronavirus,” says Dr. Kevin Lee.  “People should be cognizant of possible aerosol transmission with the conjunctiva and through ocular secretions, like tears.”  

If you or someone you know is experiencing any of these symptoms, call your medical care provider before showing up. And to get through this pandemic at your healthiest, don’t miss these 50 Things You Should Never Do During the Coronavirus Pandemic.

Get the New Book!

Want to lose 10, 20, even 30 pounds—all without dieting?! Get your copy of Eat This, Not That: The Best (& Worst) Foods in America!, and learn how to indulge smarter and lose weight fast!

Articles You May Like

Acrylic Full Set For Beginners | Nails Tutorial |
Last Minute Gift Ideas For All Those Fall Birthdays
Best Makeup Transformations 2020 | New Makeup Tutorials Compilation
Dr. Fauci Says You’ll Still Need to Wear Masks—After Vaccine
The Latest COVID Myth You Shouldn’t Believe

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *